CHILDREN KILLED IN LOCH CRASH NAMED

CHILDREN KILLED IN LOCH CRASH NAMED

The two children killed in the crash near Oban, Argyll and Bute, were yesterday (Thurs) named as Leia and Seth McCorrisken.

Leia is three years old. Seth is two years old.

A spokeswoman for Police Scotland added: “Enquiries are continuing to establish the exact circumstances of the incident and a report will be submitted to the Procurator Fiscal.

“Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to contact the Divisional Road Policing Unit at Campbeltown on 101.”

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    • After working as a news and celebrity journalist in the uber-glamorous Los Angeles with Pacific Coast News, our deputy news editor Paul has returned to News Today where he is a deputy news editor. Also working at SWNS, Paul runs a team of hard-working reporters that span the length and breadth of the UK.

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