FASHION-CONSCIOUS THIEF CAUGHT WEARING THE SAME SHIRT ON EVERY CRIME

FASHION-CONSCIOUS THIEF CAUGHT WEARING THE SAME SHIRT ON EVERY CRIME

A fashion-conscious burglar who went on a two-year stealing-spree was finally caught by police ‘super recognisers’ who snared him by analysing the LOGOS on his shirts.

Richard Shelley, 38, was slapped with a five-year year jail term earlier this month after police used special computer software to identify him by his clothing.

Between January 2013 and June 2015, Shelley targeted shops and schools in locations across London, including Westminster, Waltham Forest, Hammersmith and Fulham, and Richmond-upon-Thames.

The thief was caught on CCTV at a number of the crime scenes – and detectives from the Met’s Super Recognisers Unit used the Forensic Image Linking system (FILM) to identify suspect images that showed a suspect with a similar appearance to Shelley.

Officers noticed that Shelley, of Thamesmead, south-east London, would regularly wear the same Everlast-branded black t-shirt.

The facial recognition identifications made by the recognisers, combined with the logo recognition searches resulted in the 11 convictions for buglary.

When arrested Shelley was already serving a suspended sentence for burglary.

DCI Mick Neville, head of the Central Image Forensic Team said: “Once again Scotland Yard is at the forefront of developing crime fighting tools.

“Many criminals wear logos and patterns on their clothes and this software will allow us to target even more prolific criminals.

“The FILM system enables our super recognisers to industrialise the number of convictions from CCTV – with the addition of logo recognition software we can improve it further still.

“By using images in this systematic way, we can now solve thousands more crimes and make London safer.”

Detective Sergeant Eliot Porritt of the Super Recognisers Unit said: “The Super Recogniser Unit continues to identify and link crimes committed by habitual offenders.

“Even when a criminal is serving a sentence, they can be linked to additional crimes and further arrested. If a crime has been committed and it is caught on camera, we will do our utmost to identify the suspect.

“Shelley has demonstrated that he is a habitual burglar. The distress and inconvenience caused to the owners, service users and employees at the venues he targeted is immeasurable.

“We are delighted that the communities of London will not be subjected to his criminal activities for some time.”

    Tags:

    • Associate news editor John kicked off his career in journalism when he was with news agency SWNS in its’ earliest days over 30 years ago. During this time he’s had the honor of working with some major newspaper titles including the Daily Express and The Sun, both as district and head office reporters.

      • Show Comments (0)

      Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

      comment *

      • name *

      • email *

      • website *

      This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

      Ads

      You May Also Like

      WOMEN 'SUFFER FROM MORE AILMENTS THAN MEN'

      DAILY EPILEPSY DRUG ‘PREVENTS FITS’

      A once-a-day epilepsy drug may be as effective as a twice-daily drug, according to ...

      HISTORY FAN BOUGHT POSTCARD FROM 1938 ON EBAY, WRITTEN BY HIS MUM

      HISTORY FAN BOUGHT POSTCARD FROM 1938 ON EBAY, WRITTEN BY HIS MUM

      A history fanatic was gobsmacked when he bought a postcard which had been sent ...

      Pregnant women with whose blood pressure is even slightly raised can be dramatically more at risk of developing diabetes or heart disease, say scientists. In the first study of its kind a condition called pre-hypertension - where blood pressure is in the upper range of normal - has been shown to be potentially dangerous. Up to one-in-seven expectant mothers in the UK already suffer high blood pressure and the discovery could lead to many more requiring monitoring. Professor Jian-Min Niu, of Guangdong Women and Children Hospital in China, said: "Our findings underscore an important issue that has been long ignored in clinical practice - the fact criteria for hypertension in pregnancy are derived from the general population. "We anticipate if reaffirmed in further research, our study could spark a change in what we currently deem healthy blood pressure in pregnant women." The research found pregnant women whose blood pressure is in the upper ranges of normal could be at high risk of developing metabolic syndrome - a combination of diabetes, hypertension and obesity - and heart disease risk after giving birth. Current guidelines do not distinguish between pregnant women and the general population and define hypertension as persistently elevated blood pressure that is 140 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) systolic or 90 mm Hg diastolic and above. Readings of 120-139 mm Hg systolic over 80-89 mm Hg diastolic is deemed 'pre-hypertension' - a warning sign of high blood pressure in the future. But the study published in Hypertension said pregnant women with blood pressure in this range had 6.5 times greater odds of developing metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lower normal range. It looked at 507 Chinese women with uncomplicated pregnancies, no history of hypertension and normal blood sugar and cholesterol who underwent seven or more blood pressure measurements along with other standard tests including weight measurements and foetal ultrasounds. Blood sugar and cholesterol levels were also tested at the start, shortly before and after giving birth and once every few months for up to 1.6 years after giving birth. The participants were grouped into three categories including those whose blood pressure remained on the lower end of normal (34%), around the mid-point (52%) or in the pre-hypertension range (13%). A series of snapshot measurements did not predict future risk but patterns of repeated elevations did - highlighting the dynamic nature of blood pressure during pregnancy. The results support the idea of pregnancy as a cardiovascular stress test for women that can reveal underlying disturbances in blood pressure regulation, glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Abnormalities in all three areas can disrupt functions and lead to full-blown cardiovascular disease years down the road. Prof Niu said globally the burden of cardio-metabolic diseases in women has been rising steadily over the last decades. He said: "Blood pressure measurements are already done as matter of routine and cost-effective checkups during pregnancy so our findings underscore this tool's potential to gauge a woman's post-partum cardiovascular risk. "Early identification of metabolic risk factors and implementation of lifestyle modifications may help delay the onset of cardiovascular disease that would present itself 20 to 30 years after delivery."

      NHS WORKER ACCUSED OF CHILD ABUSE ADMITS INTIMATE PIERCING

      An NHS mental health worker accused of sexually abusing vulnerable teenage girls has admitted ...

      Login