HUNT FOR SEX FIEND WHO MOLESTED 10-YEAR-OLD GIRL WHO WAS CYCLING WITH A PAL

DRUG DEALER JAILED FOR THROWING STASH AS HE WAS CHASED BY POLICE

A drug dealer was jailed after being caught on camera littering – cocaine.

Marcus Blackwood was seen on CCTV throwing a bag of white powder on the ground as he was being chased by police, which turned out to be ten wraps of the Class A drug.

Blackwood, 36, was collared by plain-clothed City of London police officers who stopped him in his silver Mercedes.

As police searched the vehicle, Blackwood, from Beckenham, south London, got out of the car and began running away.

CCTV footage shows Blackwood throwing an item, which was a bag containing ten wraps of cocaine, into an underground car park.

When coppers finally caught him, they found five more wraps of cocaine hidden in his underpants.

Police drugs recovery dogs were used to search his home address where a shoe box was discovered containing measuring scales, 12 wraps of cocaine, cutting agents, MDEC (Ethylone) and other drug paraphernalia.

In total, the drugs and cutting agents were estimated to be worth in excess of £30,000.

Detective Inspector Rob Stirling from the City of London Police said: “Due to the weight of evidence and the tenacity of Detective Constable Thomas Hayball, who gave chase and detained him, Blackwood had no choice but to plead guilty to supplying drugs.

“The City of London attracts many people to its thriving nighttime economy, which we welcome.

“We want people to come here to have a good time but at the same time we want them to remain safe.

“We have a zero tolerance to drugs being used or sold here and will continue to be proactive in our approach to stop this from happening.”

He was jailed for four years at the Old Bailey on Tuesday after pleading guilty to possession with intent to supply.

    Tags:

    • Our new reporter Izzy started doing work experience at SWNS when she was just 14-years-old. Needless to say, she’s a pretty brainy one! She chose not to attend university after finishing schools and joined the SWNS team full time instead. Working in the Bristol office, Izzy is one of our main reporters.

      • Show Comments (0)

      Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

      comment *

      • name *

      • email *

      • website *

      This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

      Ads

      You May Also Like

      MCDONALDS WORKER'S RANT ABOUT "RUDE" CUSTOMERS GOES VIRAL

      MCDONALDS WORKER’S RANT ABOUT “RUDE” CUSTOMERS GOES VIRAL

      A McDonald’s worker fed-up with rude customers has posted an astonishing rant on Facebook ...

      A cat charity has come up with an unusual new way for people to interact with the animals in its care - by installing a live webcam feed. Thanks to two new webcams, people will be able to go to the Cats Protection website and follow the antics of whichever cat is currently staying in one pen at the National Cat Adoption Centre. The pinhole cameras have been installed in the top and side of the pen at the charity's centre in Chelwood Gate, East Sussex. They will be on every day when staff on duty between 8.15 am and 4.45 pm so viewers can watch the mogs eat, play and sleep. Cats Protection's virtual homing manager Clare Kiernan said the charity hopes that by giving cat lovers an insight into the daily life of some of its cats, more people will choose to adopt through its branches or adoption centres. She said: "We're always looking for ways to tell people about the many wonderful cats we have in our care throughout the UK that need a new, loving home. "The webcams seemed like a brilliant idea to us, so people can see for themselves just how funny, charming and entertaining cats can be. "Whether you're taking a sneaky break from work to log on, or watching online with the kids, the live stream is endlessly entertaining. "From the high-energy mayhem created when the pen is occupied by a litter of kittens, to the calming and relaxing vibes from a resting older cat, we hope that by tuning in viewers will get a sense of what they're missing out on." Cats Protection is thought to be the first UK cat charity to install cameras in one of its centres. The idea is not completely new, though, as The Donkey Sanctuary in Devon and Edinburgh Zoo in Scotland also have similar cameras installed. Clare, who joined the charity last July, said the cameras will always be in the same pen but the cats people get to see will change as they find new homes. She also said the home plans to put in more cameras in the coming months. She said: "The cat on show will probably change every week or so as the cats go to their forever homes. "We hope to have some kittens in there soon - we did when we were trying this out and it was very entertaining. "We hope to scale it up and put cameras in other branches of the charity. "Some of them are quite remote so it would hopefully highlight the cats there more." All camera-ready cats are ready to go to a new home and first in the hot-seat is two-year-old Eric. He has been at the home for just under two weeks. Clare said: "We picked him to be first because he is a very affectionate cat. "His previous owners said he acts like a dog because of the way he follows people around. I don't think he will be here long."

      CAT CHARITY SETS UP WEBCAM TO VIEW RESCUE ANIMALS

      A cat charity has come up with an unusual new way for people to ...

      Pregnant women with whose blood pressure is even slightly raised can be dramatically more at risk of developing diabetes or heart disease, say scientists. In the first study of its kind a condition called pre-hypertension - where blood pressure is in the upper range of normal - has been shown to be potentially dangerous. Up to one-in-seven expectant mothers in the UK already suffer high blood pressure and the discovery could lead to many more requiring monitoring. Professor Jian-Min Niu, of Guangdong Women and Children Hospital in China, said: "Our findings underscore an important issue that has been long ignored in clinical practice - the fact criteria for hypertension in pregnancy are derived from the general population. "We anticipate if reaffirmed in further research, our study could spark a change in what we currently deem healthy blood pressure in pregnant women." The research found pregnant women whose blood pressure is in the upper ranges of normal could be at high risk of developing metabolic syndrome - a combination of diabetes, hypertension and obesity - and heart disease risk after giving birth. Current guidelines do not distinguish between pregnant women and the general population and define hypertension as persistently elevated blood pressure that is 140 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) systolic or 90 mm Hg diastolic and above. Readings of 120-139 mm Hg systolic over 80-89 mm Hg diastolic is deemed 'pre-hypertension' - a warning sign of high blood pressure in the future. But the study published in Hypertension said pregnant women with blood pressure in this range had 6.5 times greater odds of developing metabolic syndrome compared to those in the lower normal range. It looked at 507 Chinese women with uncomplicated pregnancies, no history of hypertension and normal blood sugar and cholesterol who underwent seven or more blood pressure measurements along with other standard tests including weight measurements and foetal ultrasounds. Blood sugar and cholesterol levels were also tested at the start, shortly before and after giving birth and once every few months for up to 1.6 years after giving birth. The participants were grouped into three categories including those whose blood pressure remained on the lower end of normal (34%), around the mid-point (52%) or in the pre-hypertension range (13%). A series of snapshot measurements did not predict future risk but patterns of repeated elevations did - highlighting the dynamic nature of blood pressure during pregnancy. The results support the idea of pregnancy as a cardiovascular stress test for women that can reveal underlying disturbances in blood pressure regulation, glucose and cholesterol metabolism. Abnormalities in all three areas can disrupt functions and lead to full-blown cardiovascular disease years down the road. Prof Niu said globally the burden of cardio-metabolic diseases in women has been rising steadily over the last decades. He said: "Blood pressure measurements are already done as matter of routine and cost-effective checkups during pregnancy so our findings underscore this tool's potential to gauge a woman's post-partum cardiovascular risk. "Early identification of metabolic risk factors and implementation of lifestyle modifications may help delay the onset of cardiovascular disease that would present itself 20 to 30 years after delivery."

      HOSPITAL TO SCRAP SELF SERVICE SYSTEM AFTER PATIENTS FAKING SYMPTOMS

      A hospital could be forced to scrap its self-service check-in system because people are ...

      Login