MAN JAILED FOR 12 YEARS FOR BATTERING A BABY GIRL

MAN JAILED FOR 12 YEARS FOR BATTERING A BABY GIRL

A dangerous man who fractured a little baby’s skull in TWO violent attacks after losing his temper has been jailed for 12 years.

Steven Davies, may have caused the injuries by punching, kicking, stamping, throwing or swinging the baby girl by her ankles, a court heard.

The shocking damage was caused when the baby was less than a year old.

Davies’s disturbing offences came to light in October 2013, after the baby was examined and found to have a complex skull fracture which doctors said would have required “extreme force”.

Leeds Crown Court, West Yorks., heard the youngster was taken to hospital after she had spent the day in Davies’ care.

He had lied to the the child’s mother, telling her he had sought medical attention for the baby’s injuries after claiming she had hit her head on a coffee table.

But doctors rejected Davies account, they said the skull fracture had been caused by a blunt impact, such as punching, kicking, stamping or being thrown into a hard surface. They also found evidence of another, older skull fracture.

That injury, believed to have been caused three months earlier, was consistent with a severe blow such as a slap.

Thankfully the child has made a full recovery despite the severity of the injuries she suffered, the court was told.

While he denied causing any injury to the child, a jury found Davies guilty of two counts of causing grievous bodily harm with intent.

The court heard he has previous convictions for violence, including punching and kicking a former partner in an assault in 2010. A probation report assessed him as dangerous

Caroline Wiggin, for Davies, said her client continued to deny carrying out the offences.

Judge Rodney Jameson, QC, said: “What I am sure of is that you are incapable of controlling your emotions, in particular, your temper when you are left alone with a vulnerable child.

“I am satisfied it is that, rather than a deliberate desire to cause wanton injuries, that has occurred on these occasions.”

Davies, of Normanton, West Yorks., must serve a custodial term of 12 years, of which he must serve at least eight years before he is allowed to apply for parole, followed by a further three years on licence.

Judge Jameson imposed the extended sentence after telling Davies he considered him to pose a serious risk of causing harm to others in the future.

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