Helicopter crashes into crane in central London

By Gerald Heneghan

A helicopter has crashed into a crane in central London this morning (January 16th), killing two people and injuring nine others.

The aircraft hit the structure in Vauxhall at around 8am and more than 60 firefighters are said to be in attendance at the scene, alongside police officers and the London Ambulance Service.

Witness Paul Ferguson told BBC News how the vehicle “plummeted straight into the ground”.

“It exploded and you can imagine the smoke coming out of it. It was probably heading from the nearby heliport,” he said.

Another bystander, Chris Matthison, told the news outlet that the crane had experienced significant damage in the incident and could be lying across Nine Elms Road.

“I heard a very unusual dull thud, then there was silence. The silence really took my imagination. Emergency services responded very quickly,” he said.

Police confirmed the crash had taken place, but claimed it was too early for any casualties to be confirmed.

The helicopter is said to have cartwheeled in the air before hitting the ground and exploding, sending up a towering column of smoke.

Witnesses also reported low visibility at the scene, with mist obscuring the top of a nearby tower block.

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